Visit the Houghton-le-Spring Heritage Centre
[ YOU ARE HERE: Houghton Heritage > Articles > House-by-House > Nesham Place ]

 

Nesham Place, Houghton-le-Spring: A Shop by Shop & House by House Guide

Nesham Place, Houghton-le-Spring, around 1900

Nesham Place (pronounced ‘Nee-sham’) is located east of Houghton-le-Spring town centre, a short walk from St Michael’s Church via Church Street. The name derives from John Nesham, a coalmine and railway owner, but is often incorrectly spelt as ‘Neasham’, which is a place south-east of Darlington. The area was also known as Quality Hill owing to the affluence of the people who lived there, coupled with the grand houses. The historical significance of the properties was recognised when the Nesham Place Conservation Area was designated in 1975. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2009 - 2011.

Article Copyright © Books of the North 2009 - 2011.

History of Sunderland Street, Houghton-le-Spring

PLAN COMING SOON
Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

NORTH SIDE OF THE STREET

Melrose, Nesham Place, as seen in 1944 (with Harry & Mary Tucker) and 2011

 

Melrose, Nesham Place
(North Side)

A high walled property located next door to Myre Hall Residential Home, Church Street.
1998 – Sold in October 1998 for £135,000.

The Presbyterian Church, Nesham Place, circa 1970s.  Nesham House, Nesham Place, now stands on this site

 

Nesham House, Nesham Place
(North Side)

This is a modern property which stands on the site of the Presbyterian Church.
Six windows along the top. Door in centre with large pillars on each side.
1983 – Nesham House was built on the site of the Presbyterian Church.
2009 – Listed for sale with a price tag of £450,000. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Gap :: - leads to Oaklands, Nesham Place.

 

Cheswick House, 2 Nesham Place
(North Side)

Details to go here.

 

Unknown 4 Nesham Place
(North Side)

Assumed it is 4 Nesham Place.
1916 – Jane Dobson, 86 years, of 4 Nesham Place, was buried at Hillside Cemetery in January 1916.

 

6 Nesham Place
(North Side)

1906 – Elizabeth Jane Forster, 56 years, of 6 Nesham Place, was buried at Hillside Cemetery in April 1906.

 

Wenvoe, 6A Nesham Place
(North Side)

This property appears to have been named after the Welsh village of Wenvoe.
1979 – A first floor bathroom was added to the property at the rear.

 

8 Nesham Place
(North Side)

???? – Occupied by Mrs Kirtley, a teacher at the Newtown Infants School in the Market Place. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Gap :: - with a white gate.

 

The Manor House, 10 Nesham Place
(North Side)

The Manor House has a plaque on its main door which reads: DR JOHN A SINCLAIR.
Property with two doors and the curved window in the centre.
1891 – Manor House occupied by Dr Walter Lyon and his assistant, A. Neatts.
1950s to 1970s – The Manor House was the practice of Doctors Sinclair, Robson and Locke.
To be confirmed as bring Number 10 Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Small gap between the properties::

 

Laburnum House, 12 Nesham Place
(North Side)

This property has a solitary laburnum tree growing in its small strip of garden.
Five windows along the top.

 

:: Gap :: - leads to properties behind, including Krysan, Nesham Place.

 

Krysan, Nesham Place
(North Side)

1968 – A house called Krysan was built on land behind the main road of Nesham Place.
???? – Occupied by a Mr A Humphreys.
1983 – The present owners (as of Dec 2011) moved in.
2011 - A wellbeing consultancy was based at Krysan, Nesham Place.

 

Ashleigh / Heatherlea House /Warden House, 12 Nesham Place
(North Side)

1701 – The property was built in 1701 or 1702 as a Manor House.
1745 - An extension, consisting of eight rooms, for use by the servants, was built onto the west end of Warden House (this extension was named Ashleigh in later years).
c1870s – Farm buildings, cottages and stables to the rear of the property were demolished.
c1886 – Dr James O’Flannaghan moved his practice in to Warden House from Church Street. In 1891 he was there with his wife, four daughters and three sons. He ceased practising in 1898.
1906 – The property deeds show that the land was split up between Ellen Todd, Ellen Pearson and their stepmother, Elizabeth Dixon.
1906/1947 – The property was separated into Ashleigh, Heatherlea and Wardenhouse.
1940s to 1970s – Hetherlea was owned by Mr & Mrs R Bowness.
1950 – On April 26th 1950, Heatherlea House became a listed building.
c1960s – Ken Richardson, local historian, lived in Ashleigh.
c1960s – Heatherlea was owned by Mr & Mrs R Reeves.
c1996 – Ian Trevor Brown lived in Wardenhouse. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.
Listed building description:

NZ34NW HOUGHTON-LE-SPRING NESHAM PLACE (north side)
7/52
Heatherlee House and Warden
26.4.50 House (formerly listed as
Heatherlee and No 14)
and front railings
G.V. II
House, now 2 separate dwellings. Mid C18. Brick with rusticated stone quoins; roof of Welsh slate. 2 storeys, 5 sash windows with glazing bars in architraves; central door in architrave under pulvinated frieze and cornice. Roof has low stone-coped gable parapet resting on curved coped kneelers, and 2 end brick chimneys. Area railings on dwarf wall; cast iron, spear-headed with finials to principals.
Listing NGR: NZ3451849890

 

The Wynnes, 14 Nesham Place
(North Side)

c1900 – This property was added to Warden House as an extension, as servant accommodation consisting of nine rooms. Apparently, two rooms were won back by the owner of Warden House, leaving the Wynns as an L-shaped building.
???? – The property was divided off from Warden House and became the tied residence for the headmaster of the Royal Kepier Grammar School.
A twin-fronted house, made of a newer type of bricks than that of its neighbours. For many years this was the constituency office for Fraser Kemp MP.

 

16 Nesham Place
(North Side)

16 & 18 appear attached to each other and constructed of the same type of stone.

 

18 Nesham Place
(North Side)

Appears to be a two-storey property with a garage attached (consisting of one door and a garage door).
???? – Apparently owned by pharmacist Colin Ross.

 

18A Nesham Place
(North Side)

21931 – The property is thought to have originally been the garden of 18 Nesham Place and a Chemist shop was erected on the site around 1931.
???? – Owsnett’s Butchers.
1996 – The shop was known as W. Woods, electrical.
2008 – Northolm Pet Supplies opened in 2008. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

19 Nesham Place
(North Side)

???? – 19 Nesham Place was occupied by the Ritchey / Ritchie family.
???? – Post Office (on 1958 o/s map)
2011 – Market Place sandwiches.

The Wheatsheaf Pub, 20 Nesham Place, Houghton-le-Spring, around 1900

 

The Wheatsheaf Public House, 20 Nesham Place
(North Side)

For details of past landlords of the Wheatsheaf Pub, visit the Public Houses section.

 

History of Sunderland Street, Houghton-le-Spring

SOUTH SIDE OF THE STREET

 

1 Nesham Place
(South Side)

Semi-detached property

 

Houghton House, Nesham Place
(South Side)

Double fronted with curved archway to the right.
1901 – Occupied by Francis Grimshaw, widow, daughter Frances J, and son Arthur Grimshaw, a civil engineer.
2009 – Sold in December 2009 for £340,000.
2011 – Airedale Forestry Ltd. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Gap :: - leads to two nurseries.

 

The Old Academy, 7 Nesham Place
(South Side)

Three storied property with plaque stating: HYT 27FT
Further information on the history of this property is required; the Old Academy sign in the house doorway appears to be modern and it is thought that the Academy was actually on the north side. This is based on an antique print of the Academy which clearly depicts the property now known as the Manor House (10 Nesham Place tbc) on the north side.

 

9 Nesham Place
(South Side)

No 9 and 11 are made of a more modern brick.
1958 – O.S map – empty plot of land.

 

11 Nesham Place
(South Side)

No 9 and 11 are made of a more modern brick. The property does not necessarily stand on the same site as the original number 11.
1904 – Elizabeth Jane Hunter, aged 4, of 11 Nesham Place, was buried at Hillside Cemetery in January 1904.
1958 – O.S. map – empty plot of land. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Road called Mount Pleasant ::

Nesham Place Methodist Church, c1920, replaced with Nesham Cottage, Mount Pleasant, in 2002

 

Nesham Cottage, Nesham Place
(South Side)

2002 – A modern bungalow was built on the site of the former Nesham Place Methodist Church. The entrance to this property is on Mount Pleasant. For a full history of Nesham Place Methodist Church, which was built in 1837 and expanded in 1867, visit the Methodism in Houghton section of the Houghton Heritage website.

 

15 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place.

 

17 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place.

 

21 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place
There doesn’t appear to be a 19 Nesham Place, as number 21 was next door to number 17.

 

23 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place. c1900 – Photo shows the original building which stood on this site was a store owned by H. Walton. A plaque adorned the property which read: HYT 36 FT. A sign on the building read: ‘R. HALL. General cartman, furniture removed on reasonable terms.’

 

25 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place.
1966 - Sign Post Church Magazine – George Turnbull of 25 Nesham Place, passed away aged 64 years.

 

27 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

29 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place.

 

31 Nesham Place
(South Side)

This property is made of a more modern brick than other properties in Nesham Place. Article Copyright © Books of the North 2011-2012.

 

:: Footpath to Kirklee, formerly known as Kirklee Lane ::

 

 

Article and research by Paul Lanagan, local historian

If you have enjoyed this article and would like to make a donation to Houghton-le-Spring Heritage Society, please click DONATE for PayPal or to have your name recorded in the Book of Benefactors & Supporters click BOOK:

Click here to donate and have your name included in the Book of Benefactors

 

Paul Lanagan wishes to place on record his thanks to the following:

:: Grateful thanks go to Alan Vickers for sharing information provided by Ken Richardson and Michael Niven on the history of Warden House, Ashleigh and the Wynns. Without Alan’s help, the puzzle of the Warden House, Ashleigh and Heatherlea ‘trio’ would not have been solved. :: Marion Moore of Krysan, Nesham Place. :: Pauline Luxmoore-Bell for information about 18A Nesham Place.

Disclaimer about this house-by-house guide
Your attention is directed to the disclaimer as found on the About page.

 

 


[ YOU ARE HERE: Houghton Heritage > Articles > House-by-House > Nesham Place ]

 

Copyright © 2012 - All Rights Reserved | About this site

The Gilpin family crest

PAGE UPDATED: 17/08/2012

Possibly 13 Nesham?? NZ34NW HOUGHTON-LE-SPRING NESHAM PLACE (north side) 7/51 Ashleigh (formerly listed as No 13) 26.4.50 G.V. II House. Early C19. Brick; roof of Welsh slate. 2 storeys, 2 modern casement windows having projecting stone cills and painted lintels. 6-panelled door, under oblong fanlight with glazing bars, in raised stone surround. Rusticated quoins. Roof has one brick chimney at left. Included for group considerations. The following is taken from some background information, including drawings and maps, which I was given some years ago by a man whose ancestors had lived in Warden House, Nesham Place, from c1886 (note the spelling of 'Nesham'): "The original house was built in 1701/2 on a large site near the western approach to the Market Place. It was built as the Manor House and was a very grand house. To the rear there were some farm buildings, a row of cottages and stabling, but these may have been demolished in the 1870s. In 1745, an extension of eight rooms was built on to the western end of the original house to provide accommodation for an army of servants. During the early years of the 19th century a new Manor House was built in Nesham Place. Warden House was subdivided into three houses possibly some time between 1906 - 1947. " I can recall the time when 'Manor House; was used as a surgery by three local doctors, unfortunately I do not have any further information on this. The area was extensively researched by the late Ken Richardson and he was the author of one or two books on the area. 'Houghton le Spring in old postcards' may have more information and photos of Nesham Place. Of the collieries listed by 'mymarras' Lambton D pit was not one that was owned by John Nesham.